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SECTION 11

CVECO INCIDENT

MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

CHAPTER TITLE PAGE
1 Purpose …………………………………..… Page 03
2 Industry Initiating A Call …………………... Page 04
3 Incident Command ………………………. Page 05
4 Industries With Limited Response ……….. Page 06
5 Industries With Response Capabilities …. Page 06
6 Municipal Fire Rescue Services (MFRS) ... Page 07
7 CVECO Response & Staging ………….. Page 08
8 Command Sectors ……………………… Page 08
9 Incident Command Considerations …..… Page 09
10 Safety Officers Considerations …………… Page 10
11 Emergency Evacuation ………………….. Page 11
12 Personnel Accountability Report (PAR) ... Page 11
13 Emergency Medical Services (EMS) ..… Page 12
14 Rapid Intervention Teams (RIT) ….……….. Page 12
15 Escalating The Command Structure …… Page 12
16 All Clear ………………………………………… Page 13
17 Sample Responses ……………………… Page 14

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER TITLE PAGE
       
  Appendices    
  A Tactical Priorities Page 28
  B Fire Control Page 29
  C Municipal Fire Rescue Services (MFRS) Page 30
  D Command Sectors Page 32
  E Unified Command Page 32
  F Sector Officers Page 33
  G Safety Officers Page 34
  H Personnel Accountability Report (PAR) Page 35
  I Rapid Intervention Teams (RIT) Page 36
  23 Revision History Page 37

 

 

Index

1. PURPOSE:  
     
1.1 This section of the CVECO manual identifies operating guidelines that can be employed in establishing command and managing an emergency situation.
   
1.2 This system should be considered the basic incident management system to be used on any size or kind of incident. The only change in using the incident management system on a very large incident rather than a small incident is the method of growth of the basic emergency management organization to meet the increased needs and use of your company specific emergency plan.
   
1.3 The CVECO incident management system provides for the effective management of personnel and resources and use of company emergency plans to ensure the safety and welfare of on-scene personnel and the surrounding community. This is referred to as the “strategic level”
   
1.4 The incident management organization must develop at a pace, which stays ahead of the tactical deployment of personnel and resources.
   
1.5 In order for the Incident Commander to manage the incident, they must first be able to direct, control and track the position and function of all on scene personnel, equipment and departments. This can only be achieved through good communications with their (Industrial) Emergency Site Manager, municipal fire, police EMS officials and the implementation of the company emergency plans along with an accountability system for on scene personnel.
   
1.6 Assisting agencies will normally function under the direction of the Incident Commander appointed by the jurisdiction within which the incident occurs.
   
1.7 Multi-jurisdictional incidents will normally be managed under a “unified command” management structure involving a single incident command post and single incident action plan applicable to all agencies involved in the incident

 

Index

2. INDUSTRY INITIATING A CALL:  
     
2.1 All CVECO members will advise CVECO 911 Dispatch (Fire/Police Communications) of a fire, or a corrosive/toxic gas release. Notification must be made immediately by CVECO radio if possible.
   
2.2 The industry with the incident will ensure that CVECO 911 Dispatch personnel and/or appropriate municipal officials, are advised within 10 minutes of the nature of the emergency.
   
2.3 The company shall supply an Incident Commander (IC) to meet with the Municipal Emergency Site Manager (MESM) (Fire or Police Officer) at a location of safety (to be determined by industry). For a fire related incident (Code 9) the MESM will be represented by the municipal fire service.
   
- In most cases the Industrial Incident Commander will also act as the (Industrial) Emergency Site Manager.
   
- The Municipal Incident Commander (Fire or Police Officer) will act as the Municipal Emergency Site Manager (MESM) on most incidents.
   
2.4 Upon arrival, the Incident Commander shall inform the MESM of information similar to what is requested in the CVECO checklist to ensure accuracy, or, to provide an update of the situation. If able, the IC will supply MSDS product information sheets, emergency plans, or any other data that will help with emergency operations
   
2.5 CVECO members are expected to have a designated “staging area” where municipal and industrial responders can report to. Staging is done to provide a controlled system of initial placement for responding apparatus from mutual aid groups.
   
2.6 If possible, emergency response information should be made available to the responding industrial and municipal fire rescue services when they arrive at the staging area.
   
2.7 The IC is to notify the MESM of any changes as they occur during the emergency, for example, changes affecting the safety of persons, deployment of personnel, air monitoring, status of isolating leaks, bringing the operating unit under control, etc..

 

Index

3. INCIDENT COMMAND:  
   
3.1 The incident management system will be staffed and operated by qualified personnel from any agency. A typical incident could involve the use of personnel from a variety of agencies, working in may different parts of the organization.
   
3.2 The incident management system expands and contacts organizationally based on the needs of the incident.
   
3.3 Span of control recommendations are followed closely, therefore the organizational structure is never larger than required. A Sector Officer should not have more than 5 groups reporting to him, if so, Command needs to assign another Sector Officer to handle some of his assignments. This prevents the Sector Officer from becoming overwhelmed with his part of the incident management structure.
   
3.4 The Incident Commander is responsible for all of the following functions. As command is transferred, so is the responsibility for these functions.
   
  The first 5 functions must be addressed immediately from the initial assumption of command.
   
- Assume and announce Command and establish an effective operating position.
   
- Rapidly evaluate the situation.
   
- Initiate, maintain and control the communications process.
   
- Identify the overall strategy, develop an incident action plan, and assign personnel and equipment.
   
- Develop and effective “incident management organization” utilizing his site emergency plans.
   
- Provide tactical objectives.
   
- Review, evaluate, and revise (as needed) the incident action plan.
   
- Provide continuity, transfer and termination of command
   

 

 

Index

4. INDUSTRIES WITH LIMITED RESPONSE:  
     
4.1 CVECO members with no internal emergency response capabilities will contact their local municipal fire/rescue service for response to their emergency.
   
4.2 The industry will appoint an employee to fill the role of the Incident Commander who will meet the responding emergency apparatus and inform the Incident Commander of the situation at hand, and what they may need to know about the incident.
   
4.3 The company IC will supply additional responding industry or municipal responders with pertinent emergency information.
   
- For some companies the IC will be more of a Technical Advisor or a resource to the Municipal Incident Commander.
   

 

 

 

 

Index

5. INDUSTRIES WITH RESPONSE CAPABILITIES:  
     
5.1 CVECO members with internal response capabilities are expected to have a company Incident Commander report to the emergency scene.
   
5.2 The Incident Commander is expected to coordinate emergency scene operations in accordance with their company emergency plans.
   
5.3 The Incident Commander will assess the situation, and decide what resources (if any) are needed (municipal by issuing a Code 9 or industrial mutual aid), to mitigate the emergency situation and request them through CVECO 911 Dispatch.
   
5.4 Incident Command will focus on the initial fire fighting efforts and where to deploy the incoming resources when they arrive.

 

 

Index

6. MUNICIPAL FIRE RESCUE SERVICES (MFRS):  
     
6.1 The MFRS will provide industry with manpower and apparatus to assist in the mitigation of the incident.
   
6.2 The Municipal Fire Rescue Service will arrive at the initial designated industry staging area, and wait to be directed to a location at the emergency scene by the Industry Incident Command (or staging Officer).
   
6.3 The MFRS Officer in charge will look for the Industrial Incident Commander who will be identifiable by wearing the white “Incident Command” vest. The MFRS Officer may offer advice and/or assistance to Industrial Incident Commander
   
6.4 The Industrial IC needs an area to coordinate the emergency from and will establish command upon his arrival at the scene. In most cases the term command post refers to a location such as a street corner, company vehicle or possibly a nearby building.
   
6.4 It may be (if warranted) that the Sarnia Mobile Command Post will be brought to the scene, or an area designated by the industry will act as the “command post” for emergency operations.
   

 

 

Index

7. CVECO RESPONSE & STAGING:  
     
7.1 Request for (CVECO) Chemical Valley Emergency Coordinating Organization (mutual aid) may be in the form of manpower, fire fighting foam, or, industrial fire fighting expertise.
   
7.2 The responding CVECO industry emergency apparatus will report to the designated staging area of the company and wait to be directed to a position at the emergency scene by the Incident Commander (or Staging Officer).
   
7.3 This is done to prevent excessive apparatus congestion at the emergency scene and to allow Command to evaluate conditions prior to assigning tasks.
   
7.4 Some companies may appoint a “Staging Officer” who will coordinate movement to and from the “staging area” under direction of the Incident Commander.
   
7.5 Each company should have a secondary staging area if conditions make the initial designated staging area unusable.
   
7.6 Responding agencies will respond to the initial company-designated staging area unless otherwise advised.
   

 

Index

8. COMMAND SECTORS:  
     
8.1 At the emergency scene the Incident Commander will divide the area up into sectors. Each sector or area will have a “Sector Officer” who will report his observations or actions to the Incident Commander.
   
8.2 When the Incident Commander wants a task done in a specific area, he communicates with the Sector Officer, who assigns his people the task. When the task is carried out, the Sector Officer reports back to the Incident Commander.

 

 

 

Index

9. INCIDENT COMMAND CONSIDERATIONS:  
 
9.1 For companies with response capabilities, the following is a suggested list of command functions but not limited to . . . .
   
- Ensure CVECO codes have been issued.
   
- Vehicles positioned in safe location?
   
- Establish command! Don Command “white” Vest
   
- Obtain information from Plant Operations.
   
- Ensure all employees are accounted for and no rescue required. (Communicate rescue benchmark “all clear on rescue”)
   
- Treat the injured. (Utilize services of Lambton County EMS)
   
- Ensure any emergency block valves have been closed for product isolation.
   
- Determine immediate areas requiring cooling water?
   
- Develop a plan of attack. (Divide scene into sectors? Use “unified command”?)
   
- Determine need for additional resources? (Municipal or Industrial mutual aid)
   
- Determine need to activate company emergency plan?
   
- Determine need to isolate utilities?
   
- Determine need for controlled burn and/or foam application?
   
- Decide on type of foam and associated application rates?
   
- Determine need for air monitoring?
   
- Assign manpower and resources as required.
   
- Review and evaluate attack plan and revise plan as required.
   
- Identify need for decontamination?
   
- Communicate PARS every 30 minutes or after a significant event?
   
- Communicate command benchmarks “under control’ and/or “loss stopped” when required.
   
- Communicate “all clear” when emergency is mitigated
   

 

 

Index

10. SAFETY OFFICER CONSIDERATIONS:  
 
10.1 The Safety Officer has emergency authority to stop and/or prevent unsafe acts. A blue fire helmet and/or a blue vest identify him.
   
10.2 Some CVECO members may supply a Safety Officer through their company safety department as part of their site emergency plan.
   
10.3 The following is a suggested list of Safety Officer functions but not limited to . . . .
     
- Don Safety Officers “blue” vest.
   
- Obtain briefing from Incident Command!
   
- Understand action plan. Known hazards and concerns.
   
- Carry out 360-degree scene survey and identify any risks.
   
- Determine need and request additional Safety Officers?
   
- Response vehicles positioned in safe location?
   
- Validate hot, cold and warm zones
   
- Obtain information from Plant Operations.
   
- Determine need or confirmation of utility isolation?
   
- Evaluate effects of weather?
   
- Ensure any (EBVs) emergency block valves have been isolated.
   
- Identify access / egress routes and deficiencies?
   
- Check exposure to teams, PPE, responders aware of hazards or risks?
   
- Check on scene attendance and control. To many, to few? Crews at risk?
   
- Effectiveness of accountability system. PARS issued?
   
- Determine if RIT team is in place. Status? Capability?
   
- Anticipate total on-scene time. Resources? Manpower? Rehab?
   
- Identify need for decontamination?
   
- Continue to review and evaluate attack plan for hazards or risks.
   
- Communicate updates or concerns to Incident Command

 

 

Index

11. EMERGENCY EVACUATION:  
     
11.1 If an unsafe situation occurs at the scene that warrants evacuation, Command will call for an “evacuation” alarm to be sounded.
   
11.2 Three long blasts on the air horns of all on-scene vehicles will be activated to alert all personnel to evacuate the area.
   
11.3 Pan - Pan - Pan on the radio is an internationally recognized distress signal. This message will be broadcast over the (all responders) radios system to clear radio traffic for an emergency broadcast.
   

 

 

Index

12. PERSONNEL ACCOUNTABILITY (PAR):  
     
12.1 Each responding CVECO member shall adopt a system to maintain accountability for all personnel assigned to the incident.
   
12.2 Every 30 minutes, or, after any significant event the Incident Commander will call for a PAR. A PAR is Personnel Accountability Report. All sectors must report in that they have a PAR on their status. This indicates that all manpower is accounted for and will be recorded on the Incident Commander or a designated Accountability Officer.
   
12.3 If any department cannot account for all it’s members then a search must be conducted for the missing people by the RIT team.
   
Note: Detailed information on on-scene accountability can be found in Section 12 “Accountability System”

 

 

Index

13. EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES (EMS):  
     
13.1 For incidents with a number of injuries, EMS would supply an Incident Site Manager (EMS Command) to coordinate triage and any other medical requirements.
   
- (Reference Section 13 Medical Assistance for more information.)

 

 

 

Index

14. RAPID INTERVENTION TEAMS (RIT):  
     
14.1 The RIT is readily deployable unit and until activated, only gets involved in limited incident activities. They cannot perform any function that might require the use of SCBA.
   
14.2 The RIT team will be available to start an immediate search if a PAR is announced and personnel are found to be missing. Command will instruct RIT on who is missing, the last known location, operations in the area and any special hazardous.
   
- It is recommended the names of any missing or injured persons not be transmitted over the radio.

 

 

Index

15. ESCALATING THE COMMAND STRUCTURE :  
     
15.1 As described, on most responses there will be an industrial Incident Commander who may also act as the Site Emergency Manager. A municipal Fire/Rescue Incident Commander who may also fill the role of the Municipal Emergency Site Manager.
   
15.2 If the incident grows into a large-scale operation the following positions may be expanded or activated depending on site emergency plans.

 

Index

15. ESCALATING THE COMMAND STRUCTURE : Continued
     
15.3 If the Industrial Emergency Operations Center (IEOC) is activated, the plant manager or his/her delegate will fill the role of the Emergency Site Manager (IESM) who will be in charge of the overall company emergency plan.
   
15.4 When this happens, the Incident Commander will transfer the role of the Emergency Site Manager to the industry person taking on this position.
   
15.5 On activation of a Code 6, Police Services will act as the Municipal Emergency Site Manager and operate from the on-scene command post.
   
15.6 Fire / Police Incident Command may appoint a Municipal Emergency Site Manager to facilitate command post meetings and decision making. At this point the MESM does not make command decisions.
   
15.7 If public safety is compromised the Municipal Emergency Operations Center (MEOC) will be activated.
   
15.8 The MEOC, may request an industry Technical Advisor to respond to their operations center to advise on product information or other emergency issues.
   

 

 

 

 

Index

16. ALL CLEAR :  
     
16.1 The (Industrial) Emergency Site Manager in conjunction with the Municipal Emergency Site Manager will issue the “all clear” on behalf of the CVECO member with the problem.

 

Index

17.0 SAMPLE RESPONSES  
     
17.1 There are five examples of response on the next eleven pages. These appendices are examples of types of responses that a CVECO member may configure depending on the response structure within their organization. These appendices shown are samples and although similar, they do not represent the exact response expectations.
 
17.2 CVECO Incident Management …………….………….…. Page 15
   
- The big picture. It provides an explanation on how the entire CVECO incident management system operates from each incident management operations position.
 
17.3 In-House Response ………………………………………... Page 19
   
- Describes a response to an incident in a plant site that can be handled by a company internal response where no assistance is required. As a minimum a Code 8 has been issued.
 
17.4 Limited In-House Response …….…………………………. Page 21
   
- Describes a response to an incident in a plant site that requires Municipal Fire/Rescue assistance, as there is limited in-house response capabilities. As a minimum, a Code 9 has been issued.
       
17.5 In-House Response With Municipal Fire Assistance …….. Page 23
   
- Describes a response to an incident in a plant site that is being handled by company internal response, but additional assistance is required from the local Municipal Fire/Rescue Service (Code 9).
 
17.6 In-House Response With Municipal Fire & Industrial Mutual Aid Assistance …... Page 25
   
- Describes a response to an incident in a plant site that is being handled by company internal response. Additional assistance is required by the local Municipal Fire/Rescue Service and Industrial mutual aid.

 

Index

17.2 SAMPLE - CVECO INCIDENT MANAGEMENT
   
   
17.2.1 Provides an example of how the entire CVECO incident management system operates from each incident management operations location. (Reference Page 18).
   
- The colour in all the appendices diagrams represent the various response groups or personnel that may operate during the emergency.
   
  · Green · - Industry
  · Red · - Municipal Fire/Rescue Departments
  · Blue · - Police Or Municipal Officials
  · Black · - Unified Command functions.
   
17.2.2 On-Scene Command Post:
   
- The on-scene command post is the center circle. It may be a street corner, a building, a vehicle or an industry command post vehicle as determined by the Incident Commanders.
   
- The industry Incident Commander, municipal Incident Commanders (Fire and/or Police) various industrial Sector Officers (if activated) work together from the Command Post in the “unified command system”
   
- Depending on specific site emergency plans the industrial Incident Commander may request a Technical Advisor to respond and assist him/her with emergency co-ordination.
   
- If the incident was to grow into a significant or long-term event, the Sarnia Mobile Command Post may be dispatched to serve as an on-scene operations headquarters.
   
  Municipal Emergency Site Manager (Facilitator as warranted)
   
  Industry Incident Commander
   
  Municipal Fire/Rescue Command
   
  Police Command
   
  Industry Sector Officers (IC from industrial mutual aid departments as warranted)
   
  Technical Advisor (as warranted)

Index

17.2 SAMPLE - CVECO INCIDENT MANAGEMENT (continued)
   
   
17.2.3 On-Scene Operations:
   
- On-scene operations is the lower center circle and takes place directly at the emergency scene.
   
- The Incident Commander (IC) at the Command Post directs the Sector Officers who co-ordinate on scene operations.
   
- The Sector Officer(s) direct specific assignments such as cooling exposures, supply water, setting up for foam attack, environmental concerns. The Sector Officer reports the status or completion of assignments to the Incident Commander
   
- The Task Officer will carry out the Sector Officers assignments and report back on the status or completion of their assignments.
  · Industry Sector Officers / Task Officers / Firefighters
  · Municipal Fire/Rescue Sector Officers / Task Officers / Firefighters (as warranted)
  · Industry Sector Officers / Task Officers / Firefighters (mutual aid as warranted)
  · Traffic Control (Outside plant boundary as warranted)
  · Containment / Evacuation (Outside plant boundary as warranted)
   
17.2.4 Industrial Emergency Operations Center (IEOC):
   
- The IEOC is the upper right square, which is activated based on the industry site emergency plan.
   
- The (Industrial) Emergency Site Manager (ESM) works from this location assisted by site representatives who coordinate the industry emergency plans.
   
- The Industry Incident Commander communicates and provides on-scene updates to the ESM.
   
  (Industrial) Emergency Site Manager
  Process Operations
  Environmental
  Health
  Safety
  Maintenance
  Utilities
  Others (As deemed necessary per plant emergency plans)

Index

17.2 SAMPLE - CVECO INCIDENT MANAGEMENT (continued)
   
   
17.2.5 Municipal Emergency Operations Center (MEOC):
   
- The MEOC is the upper left square, which is only activated based on the degree of the emergency and public safety concerns.
   
- Municipal officials work from this location. There are four MEOC as described in Section 4 of this manual
   
- The Municipal Incident Commander(s) communicate and provide on-scene updates to the Municipal Emergency Operations Center
   
- The industry may be requested to send a Technical Advisor (TA) to the MEOC to provide technical expertise or assist the Industrial IC. The TA communicates with the (Industrial) Emergency Site Manager
   
  Chair EOC Manager
   
  Fire/Rescue Official
   
  Police Official
   
  Public Works (as warranted)
   
  Community Services (as warranted)
   
  Others (As deemed necessary per municipal emergency plans)
   
  (Industry) Technical Advisor (if requested)
   
   
17.2.6 Plant Dispatch:
   
- The Plant Dispatcher is the lower right square and in most cases plant contract security carry out these duties.
   
- The Dispatcher issues CVECO codes and fulfills other duties based on the site specific emergency plans
   
   
17.2.7 CVECO 911 Dispatch:
   
- The Fire/Police Dispatcher is the lower left square.
   
- The Fire/Police Dispatcher receives the CVECO codes and communicates or passes on information to the Municipal Fire /Police or EMS officials.

Index

17.2 SAMPLE - CVECO INCIDENT MANAGEMENT (continued)
   
   
  Organization chart
   
 

Index

17.3 SAMPLE - IN-HOUSE RESPONSE  
   
   
17.3.1 Definition: An incident in a plant site that can be handled by a company internal response where no other assistance is required. As a minimum a Code 8 has been issued. Reference page 20
   
17.3.2 An employee observes a situation where emergency assistance is required and follows the plant emergency procedures.
   
17.3.3 The Plant Dispatcher initiates a call for assistance that goes out to the Plant Fire Brigade who responds to the emergency scene and initiates CVECO codes and other information as per the site emergency procedures.
   
17.3.4 The Plant Fire Brigade, or designated emergency responders attends the scene and has an Incident Commander who oversees the on-scene emergency operations.
   
17.3.5 Incident Commander who may meet the responding Municipal Emergency Site Manager (if dispatched) who would supply information on the situation.
   
- The municipal Fire or Police Officer will be dispatched to investigate based on the information provided to the CVECO 911 Dispatcher. Depending on the circumstances there may be no municipal response required.
   
17.3.6 On-scene communications will be between the Industrial Incident Commander and the Municipal Emergency Site Manager (if dispatched). The MESM will communicate information to the CVECO (911) Dispatch.
   
17.3.7 Other communications may take place between the Plant Dispatcher and the CVECO (911) Dispatch.

Index

17.3 SAMPLE - IN-HOUSE RESPONSE  
   
   
  Minimum Code 8 issued
   
   
 

Index

17.4 SAMPLE - LIMITED IN-HOUSE RESPONSE:
   
   
17.4.1 Definition: An incident in a plant site that requires Municipal Fire/Rescue assistance as there is limited in-house response capabilities. As a minimum, a Code 9 has been issued. Reference Page 22
   
17.4.2 An employee observes a situation where emergency assistance is required and follows the plant emergency procedures.
   
   
17.4.3 The Plant Dispatcher initiates CVECO Code 9 for Municipal Fire/Rescue assistance and provides other information as per the site emergency procedures.
   
17.4.4 The plant has a person to act as the Incident Commander (IC) who meets the responding Municipal Fire/Rescue Service and supplies information on the emergency situation.
   
- The Industrial IC may also fill the role of the Emergency Site Manager.
   
17.4.5 The Municipal Fire/Rescue Services attends the scene and has an Incident Commander who overseas the on-scene emergency operations.
   
- In some plants the Industrial IC may be more of a Technical Advisor and will only be a resource to the Municipal IC.
   
- If the industry supplies a trained Incident Commander, the industry IC will work with the municipal Incident Commander in the unified Command system.
   
17.4.6 The (Municipal) Incident Commander acts as the Municipal Emergency Site Manager.
   
17.4.7 On-scene communications will continue between the Municipal IC and the CVECO (911) Dispatcher. Other communications may take place between the Plant Dispatcher and the CVECO (911) Dispatcher.
   
- In Area 2 or Area 4, (if on scene) the OPP will establish communications with Municipal Fire Rescue Service.
   

Index

17.4 SAMPLE - LIMITED IN-HOUSE RESPONSE:
   
   
  Minimum Code 9 issued
   

Index

21. SAMPLE - IN-HOUSE RESPONSE WITH MUNICIPAL FIRE/RESCUE ASSISTANCE:
   
21.1 Definition: An incident in a plant site that is being handled by company internal response, but additional assistance is required from the local Municipal Fire/Rescue Service (Code 9). Reference Page 25
   
21.2 An employee observes a situation where emergency assistance is required and follows the plant emergency procedures.
   
21.3 The Plant Dispatcher initiates a call for assistance that goes out to the Plant Fire Brigade who responds to the emergency scene.
   
21.4 The Plant Dispatcher initiates a CVECO Code 9 and supplies any other information as per the site emergency procedures.
   
21.5 The Plant Fire Brigade attends the scene and has an Incident Commander who oversees the on-scene emergency operations.
   
21.7 The Municipal Incident Commander (MIC) will meet the Industrial Incident Commander and coordinate on-scene emergency operations together using the “unified incident management” system.
   
- The Industrial Incident Commander may fill a dual role by acting as the Emergency Site Manager.
   
- The Municipal Incident Commander will also act as the Municipal Emergency Site Manager.
   
21.8 On-scene communications will continue between the Industrial Incident Commander and the Municipal Incident Commander. Other communications may take place between the Plant Dispatcher and the CVECO (911) Dispatch.
   
- In Area 2 or Area 4, (if on scene) the OPP will establish communications with the CVECO (911) Dispatcher as well as the Municipal Fire Service.
   
Note: The on-scene command post may be a street corner, a building, or vehicle as determined by the Incident Commanders.

Index

21. SAMPLE - IN-HOUSE RESPONSE WITH MUNICIPAL FIRE/RESCUE ASSISTANCE: (continued)
   
  (Minimum Code 9 issued)

Index

22. SAMPLE - IN-HOUSE RESPONSE WITH MUNICIPAL & INDUSTRIAL ASSISTANCE:
   
22.1 Definition: An incident in a plant site that is being handled by company internal response. Additional assistance is required from the local Municipal Fire/Rescue Service and industrial mutual aid. Reference Page 28
   
- The Sarnia Mobile Command post may respond. It will act as the on-scene command post where the Industrial and Municipal Incident Commanders will work out of.
   
22.2 An employee observes a situation where emergency assistance is required and follows the plant emergency procedures.
   
22.2 The Plant Dispatcher initiates a call for assistance that goes out to the Plant Fire Brigade who responds to the emergency scene.
   
22.3 The Plant Dispatcher initiates a CVECO Code 9, and requests Industrial Mutual Aid assistance (as warranted). Possibly initiates a Code 6 for traffic control and supplies any other information as per the site emergency procedures.
   
22.4 The Plant Fire Brigade attends the scene and has an Incident Commander who overseas the on-scene emergency operations.
   
22.5 The Municipal Incident Commander will meet the Industrial Incident Commander and coordinate on-scene emergency operations together using the “unified incident management” system.
   
- The Incident Commander may fill a dual role by acting as the Industrial Emergency Site Manager.
   
- The Municipal Incident Commander may fill the dual role by acting as the Municipal Emergency Site Manager.

Index

22. SAMPLE - IN-HOUSE RESPONSE WITH MUNICIPAL & INDUSTRIAL ASSISTANCE: (continued)
   
22.6 On-scene communications will continue between the Industrial Incident Commander and the Municipal Emergency Site Manager. Other communications may take place between the Plant Dispatcher and the CVECO (911) Dispatch.
   
- In Area 2 or Area 4, (if on scene) the OPP will establish communications with the CVECO (911) Dispatcher as well as the Municipal Fire Service.
   
22.7 As other industrial mutual aid arrives, they are dispatched to the emergency scene as required by the Industrial/Municipal Incident Commanders.
   
22.8 Each responding mutual aid company will supply a Sector Officer to work with and under direction of the Industrial/Municipal Incident Commanders
   
- The Sarnia Mobile Command Post will act as the on-scene command post for emergency operations. This is where Incident Commanders work from.
   
- Some plants may use the mobile command post as their emergency operations center.
   
22.9 Each department will have Sector Officers who supervises their responders and who report to their specific Incident Commander.
   
22.10 If the company Industrial Emergency Operations Center (IEOC) has be established, the Incident Commander will transfer the role of the Emergency Site Manager to a person of authority who will work from their IEOC and oversee the company emergency plans.
   
22.11 If warranted, the Industrial IC may require assistance at the command post and request a Technical Advisor (TA). The TA may move between the IEOC and the on-scene command post to assist in communications, or just provide technical advice to the IC as deemed necessary.
   
22.12 If the (MEOC) Municipal Emergency Operation Center is activated, a municipal official may request a Industry Technical Advisor (TA) to respond to the MEOC to provide technical expertise as warranted.

Index

22. SAMPLE - IN-HOUSE RESPONSE WITH MUNICIPAL & INDUSTRIAL ASSISTANCE: (continued)
  (Minimum Code 6 & 9 issued)

APPENDECIES

Index

A TACTICAL PRIORITIES:  
     
A.1 There are three tactical priorities that must be completed to stabilize the overall situation. These activities are regarded as separate but interrelated activities that must be dealt with in order, they are also referred to as benchmarks.
   
A.2 In many cases in a municipal fire fighting situation these tactical priorities are for structural fire fighting. In our industry case these priorities are the same but are handled differently when they relate to industrial fire fighting.
   
A.3 Rescue is one tactical example. A Municipal Fire & Rescue Service arrives at a residence and must conduct a search to ensure no occupants are trapped inside. In industry we have emergency plans to evacuate and account for employees, contractors and visitors so the search part is completed upon arrival. A search would be required if people were reported as missing.
   
A.5 The three tactical priorities are:
   
A.5.1 Rescue: These activities are required to protect occupants, remove those who are threatened and treat the injured. In our CVECO member companies each plant or building has an emergency plan and in most cases the person meeting the responding apparatus can confirm that all occupants have evacuated the building. In the off-shift Security generally knows which buildings are empty and which are occupied. After a building has been searched, or assurance is received that it is empty, Command will make an “all clear on search” radio transmission so firefighters will know the building has been searched, is clear of victims and they are ready to move into the next tactical priority.
   
A.5.2 Fire Control: Making an initial attach on the fire and controlling its size. In industry this may be making a foam attack to extinguish a fire, or eliminating a fuel source and allowing a controlled burn. Both measures would be accompanied by the cooling of exposures. When the Incident Commander has a fire contained and no more resources are required, Command will make a radio transmission of “under control” to advise all other firefighters of the situation.

Index

A TACTICAL PRIORITIES: Continued
     
A.5.3 Property Conservation: The activities required to stop or reduce additional loss of property. In industry this could be foam application for vapour suppression of a flammable liquid, or allowing a controlled burn of a flammable gas. Both measures may be accompanied by the cooling of exposures. When Command has the fire extinguished, overhaul completed and no more resources are required the Incident Commander makes a radio transmission of “loss stopped” to advise all other firefighters of the status.
   

Index

B FIRE CONTROL:  
     
B.1 It is standard operating procedure to attempt to stabilize fire conditions by extending a well-placed and fire attack with whatever resources and actions are required to bring the fire under control.
   
B.2 The Incident Commanders needs to be aware of any non-thinking attack situations and non-thinking attackers, who freelance and act on their own.
   
B.3 In structural fire fighting the firefighter must decide between an offensive or defensive strategy.
   
B.4 Offensive Strategy is an aggressive interior attack to suppress the interior fire conditions or using handlines in a process area.
   
B.5 Defensive Strategy is used when certain interior conditions force all firefighters out of the structure and protection of exposure and suppression efforts are carried out from an exterior position. It may be applying cooling water to a process area from a perimeter position.
     
B.6 In industry most process fires are fought from a defensive position with Cooling water being applied to exposures such as tanks, pipe racks, support beams etc.

Index

B FIRE CONTROL: Continued
   
B.7 An offensive attack may take place from a defensive position that in the case of industries would be a foam attack. It may involve moving into a fire area with dry chemical to extinguish flange fires.
   
B.8 In many instances we would not make an offensive attack using hand lines, as we do during live fire training at the Lambton College Fire School. Most attacks will utilize equipment such as fire hydrant monitors, ground monitors and truck turrets.
   
B.9 If required responders would conduct a coordinated attack with handlines using fire-fighting foam, dry chemical, supported by deluge guns also applying fire-fighting foam.
   

Index

C MUNICIPAL FIRE RESCUE SERVICES (MFRS):  
     
C.1 The (MFRS) Municipal Fire Rescue Service should be called for assistance, or standby, on all emergencies. The MFRS will provide industry with manpower and apparatus to assist in the mitigation of the incident.
   
C.2 Area 1 - Sarnia, west of Indian Road
   
- Sarnia Fire Rescue Service will be the municipal responders
   
C.3 Area 2 - St. Clair Township, south of LaSalle Road
   
- St. Clair Township Fire Rescue Service will be the municipal responders
   
C.4 Area 3 - Sarnia, east of Indian Road
   
- Sarnia Fire Rescue Service will be the municipal responders
   
C.5 Area 4 - Point Edward
   
- Point Edward Fire Rescue Service will be the municipal responders

Index

C MUNICIPAL FIRE RESCUE SERVICES (MFRS): Cont . .
   
C.6 The Municipal Fire Rescue Service will arrive at the initial designated Industrial staging area, and await to be directed to a location at the emergency scene by the Industry Incident Command (or staging Officer).
   
C.7 If MFRS assistance is not required, the Industry IC should ask the MFRS Officer in charge to attend the emergency scene to be appraised of the current situation. This will avoid any misunderstanding as to why they were called.
   
C.8 The industry Incident Commander will provide the Municipal Fire Rescue Service responder’s directions to the scene. The MFRS Officer in charge will look for the Industrial Incident Commander who will be identifiable by wearing the white “Incident Command” vest. The MFRS Officer may offer advice and/or assistance to Industrial Incident Commander
   
C.9 On larger incidents the “unified” command system will be used. The Industrial Incident Commander will work along side the Municipal Fire & Rescue Command and the two will work together to mitigate the situation.
   
C.10 The Municipal Fire Rescue Service will allow the industry to maintain command of an incident as long as they feel the Industrial Incident Commander is capable and is conducting his duties in a safe and efficient manner and public safety is not being compromised.
   
- The MFRS has the authority to take command of any incident that occurs within their municipal boundaries. This will probably not be enforced unless the MRFS has reason to believe that the industry is not acting in the interest of public safety
   
C.11 If the MRFS determines that they should be Command, they will assume it by telling the Industrial IC that they are assuming Command.
   
C.12 The industry would then become a sector or a resource to Command. This would be done at the discretion of the Municipal Fire Rescue Service Command Officer.
   
C.13 It may be that the Sarnia Mobile Command Post will be brought to the scene, or an area designated by the industry and act as the “command post” for emergency operations.

Index

D COMMAND SECTORS:  
     
D.1 At the emergency scene the Incident Commander will divide the area up into sectors. Each sector or area will have a “Sector Officer” who will report his observations or actions to the Incident Commander.
   
D.2 Sectoring is a incident management method to divide the emergency scene into geographical areas called sectors and/or functional designations. As a number of resources are required it may be easier to organize another incident management system called “unified command”.
   
D.3 Sectors may be given names or titles like “north, south, east or west” sector, or by names such as 2nd Street or Ave. A sector.
   
D.4 When the Incident Commander wants a task done in a specific area, he communicates with the Sector Officer, who assigns his people the task. When the task is carried out, the Sector Officer reports back to the Incident Commander.
   
D.5 It may be that the Sector Officer will observe certain conditions and report them to the Incident Commander who will make decisions, or assign other tasks based on the information received.
   

Index

E UNIFIED COMMAND:  
     
E.1 In unified command the Commander in charge of each department reports to an operational headquarter where they work with the IC.
   
- Most incidents will be under command of an Incident Commander who is from the industrial fire department of the company with the occurrence.
   
E.2 In consultation with the other Officers, the Incident Commander makes decisions and the Sector Officer representing each department or geographical area, radio’s his responders, and provides information. The Sector Officers in this case may represent a department or company at the scene and not necessarily an area.

Index

F SECTOR OFFICERS:  
     
F.1 A “Sector Officer” is a person who is placed in command of a particular area or sector. Sectors or could be divided into the north, south, east and west side of a fire or spill area. The Sector Officer would be in charge of one of these areas or functional designations and be briefed by the Incident Commander on the strategy and objective for his area.
   
F.2 The Incident Commander would assign each Sector Officer, tactical objectives for the sector, a radio designation such as the north sector, or a title such as cooling section or foam application section. Identify any resources assigned to the sector such as Sarnia Engine 1 and Suncor FT1.
   
F.3 The tactical level officers are responsible for a specific geographical area, an assigned task or function and supervising assigned personnel within a sector. Sarnia Engine 1 may be assigned cooling and Suncor FT1 may be assigned foam application.
   
F.3 The Sector Officer will be identifiable by a red vest and maintain a visible position as much as possible. A tactical level assignment comes with the authority to make decisions and assignments, with the boundaries of the overall plan and safety conditions.
   
F.4 The Sector Officer in the specified area will be responsible for
   
- To complete any objectives assigned by the Incident Commander
   
- When a company has been assigned to a Sector, the Sector Officer directs that company into action.
   
- Directly supervise and monitor operations within their area of responsibility
   
- Have overall control of all assigned functions within their sector
   
- Ensure operations are conducted safely
   
- Provide command with essential and frequent progress reports
   
- Coordinate actions with other related activities, and adjacent sectors, through communications with Command.
   
- Request additional resources as needed
   
- Re-direct activities as necessary
   
- Re-allocate resources within the sector
   
- Monitor welfare of assigned personnel
   
- Account for all personnel in the assigned sector
   
- Shall be dressed and equipped the same as their crews

Index

G SAFETY OFFICER:  
     
G.1 The Safety Officers function at the incident is to assess hazardous and unsafe situations and develop measures for assuring personnel safety.
   
G.2 The Safety Officer has emergency authority to stop and/or prevent unsafe acts. A blue fire helmet and/or a blue vest identify him.
   
G.3 In a unified command structure a single safety officer would be designated. Assistants may be required and may be assigned from other companies for departments making up unified command.
   
G.4 Some CVECO members may supply a Safety Officer through their company safety department as part of their site emergency plan.

Index

H PERSONNEL ACCOUNTABILITY (PAR):  
     
     
Note: Detailed information on on-scene accountability can be found in Section 12 “Accountability System”
   
H.1 Each responding CVECO member shall adopt a system to maintain accountability for all personnel assigned to the incident.
   
H.2 The incident management system will maintain accountability for the location and function of each company or unit at the emergency scene. Personnel who respond to the incident should be identified by a system that provides an accurate accounting of those personnel actually responding to the scene with each company or apparatus.
   
H.3 All Sector Officers will maintain a constant awareness of the position and function of personnel assigned to operate in his sector. This awareness shall serve as a basic means of accountability that shall be required for operational safety.
   
H.4 Every 30 minutes, or, after any significant event the Incident Commander will call for a PAR. A PAR is Personnel Accountability Report. All Sectors must report in that they have a PAR on their status. This indicates that all manpower is accounted for and will be recorded on the Incident Commander or a designated Accountability Officer.
   
H.5 If any department cannot account for all it’s members then a search must be conducted for the missing people by the RIT team.

Index

I RAPID INTERVENTION TEAMS (RIT):  
     
I.1 A Rapid Intervention Team is a built in safety factor for personnel operating at an emergency scene. RIT is a group of responders that is available to mount an immediate search to locate and rescue missing or trapped firefighters.
   
I.2 The RIT is readily deployable unit and until activated, only gets involved in limited incident activities. They cannot perform any function that might require the use of SCBA while awaiting activation.
   
I.3 Request for deployment of the RIT team can be made to Command by any firefighter.
   
I.4 The RIT team will be available to start an immediate search if a PAR is announced and personnel are found to be missing. Command will instruct RIT on who is missing, the last known location, operations in the area and any special hazards.
   
I.5 The safety of the RIT team must be considered before they are sent into a structure or process area.
   
I.6 Mutual aid may be required to provide enough manpower to support the use of a Rapid Intervention Team (RIT).
   
I.7 Upon deployment of the RIT team Command will:
   
- Assign another RIT to report to the designated area.
   
- Assign RIT a designated radio channel.
   
- Switch a command radio to monitor the RIT channel.
   
- Adjust thinking to search and rescue strategies.
   
- Announce termination of RIT and request a PAR.
   
I.8 Upon entry into the hot zone the RIT will:
   
- Stay in voice contact with one another.
   
- Maintain communications with Command.
   
- Notify Command of areas searched.
   
- Recover of personnel.
   
- Identity conditions that will impede the search.

23. REVISION HISTORY:  
     
Date By Description
     
Nov. 2002 Fire Sub - Committee Original
     
Nov. 2003 D. Martin Reviewed. PAN - PAN - PAN terminology corrected and revision history added.
     
     

 

 
The latest revision to this procedure was approved by:
 
Fire Sub - Committee November 2002
 
CVECO Executive November 2002
 
CVECO General Membership January 08, 2022